Colorful background art with text "Resources for Identity Education"

1619: Four hundred years ago, in August 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed. “1619” is a New York Times audio series, hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones, that examines the long shadow of American slavery.

All My Relations: All My Relations is a team of folks who care about representations, and how Native peoples are represented in mainstream media. Between us we have decades of experience working in and with Native communities, and writing and speaking about issues of representation.

The Anatomy of an Apology: How Himpathy and Hubris Undermine Accountability: In this episode of Intersectionality Matters, host Kimberlé Crenshaw talks to Tony award-winning playwright and activist Eve Ensler about her book “The Apology” and how the withholding that is the touchstone of the inviolable code of silence among men can be broken. Ensler discusses the journey she traveled to conjure the apology she needed from her late father for sexual and physical abuse. We also hear from philosopher Kate Manne on “himpathy”, the term she coined to describe the disproportionate and inappropriate sympathy powerful men often receive in cases of sexual assault and other forms of gendered violence.

Believed: How did Larry Nassar, an Olympic gymnastics doctor, get away with abusing hundreds of women and girls for two decades? Believed is an inside look at how a team of women won a conviction in one of the largest serial sexual abuse cases in U.S. history. It’s a story of survivors finding their power in a cultural moment when people are coming to understand how important that is. It’s also an unnerving exploration of how even well-meaning adults can fail to believe.

Caught: America incarcerates more people than any country in the world. It starts with kids. On any given night, roughly 53,000 young people are in some form of lockup. Nearly 60 percent are black or Latino. We all make dumb mistakes in our youth. But for these kids, those same destructive choices have a lasting impact. Caught: The Lives of Juvenile Justice tells the stories of young lives forever changed by collisions with law and order. We’ll also hear from their parents, guards, counselors and judges, who hold the power, but whose hands are often tied by laws that ultimately fail our children.

The City: The City is an investigative podcast from USA TODAY that tells true stories about how power works in urban America. Each season we travel to a new city and team up with local journalists in the USA TODAY Network to investigate people in power.  We’re interested in the consequences of their actions on a city’s most vulnerable residents, and we try to make sense of what a power struggle in one city reveals about the challenges facing all cities. 

Code Switch: What’s CODE SWITCH? It’s the fearless conversations about race that you’ve been waiting for! Hosted by journalists of color, our podcast tackles the subject of race head-on. We explore how it impacts every part of society — from politics and pop culture to history, sports and everything in between. This podcast makes ALL OF US part of the conversation — because we’re all part of the story.

More Perfect: Supreme Court decisions shape everything from marriage and money to public safety and sex. We know these are very important decisions we should all pay attention to – but they often feel untouchable and even unknowable. Radiolab’s first ever spin-off series, More Perfect, connects you to the decisions made inside the court’s hallowed halls, and explains what those rulings mean for “we the people” who exist far from the bench. More Perfect bypasses the wonkiness and tells stories behind some of the court’s biggest rulings.

Rough Translation: How are the things we’re talking about being talked about somewhere else in the world? Gregory Warner tells stories that follow familiar conversations into unfamiliar territory. At a time when the world seems small but it’s as hard as ever to escape our echo chambers, Rough Translation takes you places.

Scene on Radio, Season 2 – Seeing White: Scene on Radio is a podcast that tells stories exploring human experience and American society. Produced and hosted by John Biewen, Scene on Radio comes from the Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) at Duke University and is distributed by PRX. In Seeing White, Biewen and collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika explored the history and meaning of whiteness.

Scene on Radio, Season 3 – MEN: Scene on Radio is a podcast that tells stories exploring human experience and American society. Produced and hosted by John Biewen, Scene on Radio comes from the Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) at Duke University and is distributed by PRX. In MEN, Biewen and co-host Celeste Headlee delved into sexism, patriarchy, and misogyny.

See Something Say Something: Each week, Ahmed Ali Akbar covers everything that American Muslims are talking about right now — misrepresentation in the media, equality in the mosque, Asahd memes, and much more.

Sidedoor by The Smithsonian — Episode 3 Confronting the past: A 1921 riot destroyed almost 40 blocks of a wealthy black neighborhood in North Tulsa, Oklahoma. No one knows how many people died, no one was ever convicted and no one really talked about it until a decade ago. This is the story of the Tulsa Race Massacre and why it’s important that you know it.

There Goes the Neighborhood: A podcast about how and why gentrification happens. Season 3, produced in partnership with WLRN, Miami’s public radio station, introduces us to “climate gentrification,” reporting about the ways climate change, and our adaption to it, may seriously intensify the affordable housing crisis in many cities. In many parts of the US, black communities were pushed to low-lying flood prone areas. As Nadege Green reports, in Miami, the opposite is true. Black communities were built on high elevation away from the coast. Now because of sea level rise that high land is in demand.

This Land: An 1839 assassination of a Cherokee leader and a 1999 murder case — two crimes nearly two centuries apart provide the backbone to an upcoming 2019 Supreme Court decision that will determine the fate of five tribes and nearly half the land in Oklahoma.

Uncivil: A history podcast from Gimlet Media, where we go back to the time our divisions turned into a war, and bring you stories left out of the official history.