Workplace Diversity Series, Spring 2018

Join IDE's Office of Inclusive Engagement for Session One of the Workplace Diversity Series, hosted in collaboration with the College of Education. Working in a diverse environment brings both opportunities and challenges. By becoming more informed, gaining skills, and having conversations with others, we can improve and enhance our workplace relationships and our overall campus environment. We all have a right to work in a place where we feel welcome, included and appreciated. We also have a responsibility to do our part to create this type of environment for ourselves and others, but it's not always easy. Attend these workshops to get information, ideas and support in a safe, informative and collegial environment.

We welcome requests for ADA accommodations. Please contact Alejandra Gudiño at GuidiñoA@missouri.edu to make arrangements.

Pre-registration is required for all workshops. Participants must attend all workshops offered during Sessions 1 and 2 to earn a Certificate of Completion.

Session One

You Have Options

Brittani Fults, Education and Prevention Coordinator, Office for Civil Rights & Title IX
Katryna Sardis, Education and Outreach Coordinator, RSVP Center

Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018
Noon-1:30 p.m.
314 Hill Hall

OR

Friday, April 13, 2018
Noon-1:30 p.m.
314 Hill Hall

This resource-focused workshop ensures that those directly and indirectly affected by power-based personal violence are aware of campus and community resources. Power-based violence is a form of violence that has a primary motivator: assertion of power, control and/or intimidation in order to harm another person. Power-based violence can include relationship/partner violence, assault, stalking and other uses of force, threat, intimidation or harassment of an individual. These acts are inclusive of acts committed by strangers, friends, acquaintances, intimates or other people.

Employment Assistance Program

James Hunter, Director, EAP

Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018
Noon-1:30 p.m.
314 Hill Hall

OR

Friday, April 27, 2018
Noon-1:30 p.m.
305 Hill Hall

EAP is a confidential, professional service provided to all employees, their families, retirees and organizational work units at MU. The EAP provides a variety of services to help employees influenced by a range of personal concerns or stressors. The EAP also assists work units in improving quality assurance and productivity rates. During this workshop, attendees will:

  • Learn about EAP referral procedures
  • Identify employee and work-context scenarios where EAP intervention can help
  • Gather resources for occupational and individual stress management
  • Review key questions for leadership success

ART: Achieving Resiliency Together

Kim Dude, Director, MU Wellness Resource Center

Tuesday, March 6, 2018
Noon-1:30 p.m.
314 Hill Hall

OR

Friday, May 4, 2018
Noon-1:30 p.m.
305 Hill Hall

The Wellness Resource Center has been the primary prevention office on campus since 1990. The WRC strives to create a culture of caring on campus where caring about ourselves and about each other by implementing a campaign that focuses not only on building resiliency but also creating a caring environment that supports and strengthens our resiliency. This skill-building and educational marketing campaign called ART (Achieving Resiliency Together) combines building individual resiliency with bystander intervention and environmental management to create a caring community.

Session Two: Diversity, Belonging and Wellness

We understand that diversity, inclusion and wellness are not strategies or nice things to think about, but a way of life and an imperative on campus. Session Two of the Workplace Diversity Series focuses on connecting with your community and the people around you, which includes being aware of your own social and cultural background as a bridge to understand the diversity present in other backgrounds. We encourage you to take an active part in improving your communities, connecting with others, establishing supportive social networks, developing meaningful relationships, and creating brave and inclusive spaces.

Understanding Self and Others through Cultural Humility and Mindfulness

Bini Sebastian, Counseling Psychology Doctoral Candidate

Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018
Noon-1:30 p.m.
Women's Center

OR

Wednesday, April 11, 2018
Noon-1:30 p.m.
Women's Center

Cultural humility is a lifelong process of self-reflection and inquiry that involves awareness of personal biases, advocating for others, and recognizing power imbalances in society. It allows individuals to realize that one’s own culture is not the only or best one. One way to cultivate cultural humility is through the practice of mindfulness. Mindfulness means "paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgmentally" (Kabat-Zinn, 1994). Through non-judgmental awareness and curious exploration, we can become more aware of bodily cues, thoughts, and emotions that may provide us with insight into how we view our inner and outer worlds. Mindfulness practices have been shown to improve emotional regulation, increase empathy and perspective-taking, and develop overall gratitude. In this workshop, participants will be able to identify personal values and their impact on culture, develop a personal plan for cultivating cultural humility, and experience and apply the principles of mindfulness.

Recognizing and Responding to Racism’s Impact on Mental & Physical Health

Nadia Bethley, Psychologist, Diversity Coordinator, MU Counseling Center
Renne-Lee Powers-Scott, Health, Welfare, Wellness Sr., MU Counseling Center

Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2018
Noon-1:30 p.m.
Women's Center

OR

Wednesday, April 25, 2018
Noon-1:30 p.m.
Women's Center

The mental and physical impact of ongoing exposure to racism and microaggressions is real, but it can often go unrecognized for what it is. In order to provide support for yourself and/or others, it is important to recognize some of the physical, cognitive, and emotional symptoms that students, colleagues, and friends may be experiencing as a result of the racial climate on campus, in our community, and in our society at large. This workshop will provide information for recognizing symptoms and strategies for self-care as well as for showing support for others. This workshop will also be a safe space to ask questions and share your experiences.

Awake at Work

Noor Azizan-Gardner, Executive Director of Faculty Recruitment & Retention
Director, Office of Inclusive Engagement, IDE

Tuesday, March 13, 2018
Noon-1:30 p.m.
Women’s Center

Please note: This workshop will be offered only one time.

We spend a third of our day at work. For many of us, work defines who we are. Often, we are on autopilot at the office going through what we have always done without thinking much about it day after day. Sometimes, we go from crisis to crisis relentlessly without stopping to take a breath. This workshop will share tips from the book "Awake at Work: 35 Practical Buddhist Principles for Discovering Clarity and Balance in the Midst of Work's Chaos" by Michael Carroll. Carroll writes, "recognizing that we, not work are imprisoning ourselves is critical if we expect to discover well-being in our livelihoods." Participants in this workshop will together explore ways to achieve this mindful balance and integration between work and the rest of our lives.